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Test ID HCO3 Bicarbonate, Serum

Reporting Name

Bicarbonate, S

Useful For

Diagnosis and treatment of acid-base imbalance in respiratory and metabolic systems

Specimen Type

Serum


Necessary Information


Patient's age and sex are required.



Specimen Required


Container/Tube:

Preferred: Serum gel

Acceptable: Red top

Specimen Volume: 0.5 mL

Collection Instructions:

1. Serum gel tubes should be centrifuged within 2 hours of collection.

2. Red-top tubes should be centrifuged and aliquoted within 2 hours of collection.


Specimen Minimum Volume

0.25 mL

Specimen Stability Information

Specimen Type Temperature Time
Serum Refrigerated 24 hours

Reference Values

Males

12-24 months: 17-25 mmol/L

3 years: 18-26 mmol/L

4-5 years: 19-27 mmol/L

6-7 years: 20-28 mmol/L

8-17 years: 21-29 mmol/L

≥18 years: 22-29 mmol/L

Females

1-3 years: 18-25 mmol/L

4-5 years: 19-26 mmol/L

6-7 years: 20-27 mmol/L

8-9 years: 21-28 mmol/L

≥10 years: 22-29 mmol/L

 

Reference values have not been established for patients that are <12 months of age.

Day(s) and Time(s) Performed

Monday through Sunday; Continuously

Test Classification

This test has been cleared or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is used per manufacturer's instructions. Performance characteristics were verified by Mayo Clinic in a manner consistent with CLIA requirements.

CPT Code Information

82374

LOINC Code Information

Test ID Test Order Name Order LOINC Value
HCO3 Bicarbonate, S 1963-8

 

Result ID Test Result Name Result LOINC Value
HCO3 Bicarbonate, S 1963-8

Clinical Information

Bicarbonate is the second largest fraction of the anions in plasma. Included in this fraction are the bicarbonate (HCO3[-]) and carbonate (CO3[-2]) ions, carbon dioxide in physical solution, as well as the carbamino compounds. At the physiological pH of blood, the concentration of carbonate is 1/1000 that bicarbonate. The carbamino compounds are also present in such low quantities that they are generally not mentioned specifically.

 

The bicarbonate content of serum or plasma is a significant indicator of electrolyte dispersion and anion deficit. Together with pH determination, bicarbonate measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of numerous potentially serious disorders associated with acid-base imbalance in the respiratory and metabolic systems. Some of these conditions are diarrhea, renal tubular acidosis, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, hyperkalemic acidosis, renal failure, and ketoacidosis.

Interpretation

Alterations of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide (CO2) dissolved in plasma are characteristic of acid-base imbalance. The nature of the imbalance cannot, however, be inferred from the bicarbonate value itself, and the determination of bicarbonate is rarely ordered alone. Its value has significance in the context of other electrolytes determined with it and in screening for electrolyte imbalance.

Clinical Reference

Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry, Edited by Burtis and Ashwood. Philadelphia, PA, WB Saunders Company, 1994.

Analytic Time

Same day/1 day

Method Name

Photometric, Enzymatic